alexandersix

alexandersix

Owner at Code & Tailor

Member Since 4 Years Ago

Columbia, SC

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13,890
Total
Experience

1,110 experience to go until the next level!

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Lessons Completed
130
Lessons
Completed
Best Reply Awards
1
Best Reply
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Level 3
13,890 XP
Jul
04
1 month ago
Activity icon

Awarded Best Reply on Switching From CodeIgniter To Laravel

I'm definitely a little bit biased, but after having used both CodeIgniter and Laravel, I would definitely recommend giving Laravel a shot. Here are a few of the observations that I've made over the past few years about Laravel:

  1. It's possible to do just about anything in CodeIgniter, CakePHP, Wordpress, or any other PHP framework on the market--that's the beauty of code, I suppose. The major difference about Laravel is that it's not just possible to do just about anything with Laravel, it's straightforward and enjoyable. I know it's not a physical, measurable statistic, but writing code in Laravel just feels good.

  2. Laravel is easy to learn, but there's always something more to master or dive deeper on. I'm a big sucker for being able to pick up a framework or language quickly, and Laravel more than succeeds at that with the incredible community that surrounds it (I mean heck, Laracasts is a fantastic place to start). What's cool about Laravel is that there's a seemingly endless well of things to dive deeper on and learn more about. One example that comes to mind immediately is the Eloquent ORM that is packaged with Laravel. On the surface, Eloquent is a great way to quickly and easily get records from a database. But just recently, Johnathan Reinink released his Eloquent Performance Patterns course that does a deep-dive into creating ridiculously performant Eloquent queries. That's just one example, but there are tons out there.

  3. Laravel is continually evolving. The framework itself is constantly adding great new features (and reworks of standout features from past versions like the Blade rework in Laravel 7), but there is also a lot of awesome work being done by people in the community to add functionality to the Laravel environment. A few examples that come to mind are Livewire, Inertia.js, and Spatie's incredibly large list of Laravel packages.

TL;DR--do it! Give Laravel a go! I think you'll be pleasantly surprised with what you find!

Activity icon

Replied to Switching From CodeIgniter To Laravel

I'm definitely a little bit biased, but after having used both CodeIgniter and Laravel, I would definitely recommend giving Laravel a shot. Here are a few of the observations that I've made over the past few years about Laravel:

  1. It's possible to do just about anything in CodeIgniter, CakePHP, Wordpress, or any other PHP framework on the market--that's the beauty of code, I suppose. The major difference about Laravel is that it's not just possible to do just about anything with Laravel, it's straightforward and enjoyable. I know it's not a physical, measurable statistic, but writing code in Laravel just feels good.

  2. Laravel is easy to learn, but there's always something more to master or dive deeper on. I'm a big sucker for being able to pick up a framework or language quickly, and Laravel more than succeeds at that with the incredible community that surrounds it (I mean heck, Laracasts is a fantastic place to start). What's cool about Laravel is that there's a seemingly endless well of things to dive deeper on and learn more about. One example that comes to mind immediately is the Eloquent ORM that is packaged with Laravel. On the surface, Eloquent is a great way to quickly and easily get records from a database. But just recently, Johnathan Reinink released his Eloquent Performance Patterns course that does a deep-dive into creating ridiculously performant Eloquent queries. That's just one example, but there are tons out there.

  3. Laravel is continually evolving. The framework itself is constantly adding great new features (and reworks of standout features from past versions like the Blade rework in Laravel 7), but there is also a lot of awesome work being done by people in the community to add functionality to the Laravel environment. A few examples that come to mind are Livewire, Inertia.js, and Spatie's incredibly large list of Laravel packages.

TL;DR--do it! Give Laravel a go! I think you'll be pleasantly surprised with what you find!

Apr
11
3 months ago
Activity icon

Commented on Supercharged Blade Components

That's a totally fair point (we do a lot of SPA and monolith creation at my current day-job), but there are definitely a big number of reasons to not build an SPA nowadays. Like most things, there are tons of situations and trade-offs to factor in (speed, scalability, cost, development team size, SEO needs, etc.), and I think, for the most part, most applications would be just fine as server-rendered monoliths. But again, that's definitely not to say that SPAs don't have their purpose and strengths too!

The trick with SPAs (and microservices as well) that we've seen is that, while yes, the responsibilities can be broken up and siloed more, the inter-app communication complexity begins to grow at a pretty fast rate. This can really hold up development of new features if that complexity starts to grow bigger than the complexity of having multiple developers all working on the same codebase!

We've also seen a huge benefit lately in having all of our developers work in the full stack (whether that's working on all areas of a Laravel monolith, or in two separate repositories for the SPA and the API). That's not to say each developer doesn't have their own strengths and weaknesses, but even knowing that, the benefit from knowing both sides of the application has been a great help when developing and implementing features, bug-fixes, etc.

Long story short, SPAs are definitely really hot right now, but they aren't a cure-all. Depending on a million different factors, building an application as an SPA has the potential to increase or decrease complexity, but at the end of the day, no application's user-base actually cares how an application is built, as long as it serves its purpose and helps them in some way. I think there are a bunch of people in the Laravel community who (perhaps not always the most eloquently) are pushing back against the SPA craze because of the fact that SPAs aren't the magic bullet to solve all of the web's problems, even though there are a lot of people who seem to think that. Again, that's not to say that SPAs don't have their place, because they definitely do and they're seriously good at what they're made for!