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Laravel 8 From Scratch

Laravel 8 From Scratch

laravelfromscratch.com

We don't learn tools for the sake of learning tools. Instead, we learn them because they help us accomplish a particular goal. With that in mind, in this series, we'll use the common desire for a blog - with categories, tags, comments, email notifications, and more - as our goal. Laravel will be the tool that helps us get there. Each lesson, geared toward newcomers to Laravel, will provide instructions and techniques that will get you to the finish line.

This version of our popular Laravel From Scratch series was recorded in 2021, and uses Laravel 8.

Intermediate
20 episodes
2h 3m
20
Latest Episode in This Series

Added 2 days ago

Make a Post Model and Migration

Now that you're a bit more familiar with migration classes and Eloquent models, let's apply this...

Watch
Laravel 8 From Scratch

laravelfromscratch.com

Laravel 8 From Scratch

Version: Laravel 8

We don't learn tools for the sake of learning tools. Instead, we learn them because they help us accomplish a particular goal. With that in mind, in this series, we'll use the common desire for a blog - with categories, tags, comments, email notifications, and more - as our goal. Laravel will be the tool that helps us get there. Each lesson, geared toward newcomers to Laravel, will provide instructions and techniques that will get you to the finish line.

This version of our popular Laravel From Scratch series was recorded in 2021, and uses Laravel 8.

Begin
20
Latest Episode in This Series

Added 2 days ago

Make a Post Model and Migration

Now that you're a bit more familiar with migration classes and Eloquent models, let's apply this learning...
Watch

Your Teacher | Jeffrey Way

https://laracasts.s3.amazonaws.com/avatars/jeffrey-avatar.jpg's avatar
Hi, I'm Jeffrey. I'm the creator of Laracasts and spend most of my days building the site and thinking of new ways to teach confusing concepts. I live in Orlando, Florida with my wife and two kids.
  1. Section 1 Prerequisites and Setup

    1. Free Episode Run Time 2:40

      Before we get started, come along for a quick two minute overview of the MVC architecture. MVC stands for "Model, View, Controller" and is the bedrock for building Laravel applications.

    2. Free Episode Run Time 5:51

      I hope you're excited. It's time to dig in. Now, as for prerequisites, you'll need access to a good editor, a terminal, and of course PHP and MySQL. We'll also need to get a tool called Composer installed on your machine.

    3. Free Episode Run Time 2:25

      It's very cool that we can whip up a fresh Laravel application by using composer create-project; however, there's an even simpler option that allows you to type laravel new project and, bam, you're up and running. In this episode, let's install it globally on our machine.

      Extra Credit: Install Laravel Valet to make any new Laravel project accessible via http://app-name.test.

    4. Free Episode Run Time 2:37

      We don't learn tools for the sake of learning tools. Instead, we learn tools because they help us accomplish something, or solve a problem that we currently have. As an example, you didn't learn how to use a hammer because you wanted to learn how to use a hammer. No, you learned it because it helped you hang a picture on the wall. The same is true for programming languages and frameworks, like Laravel. With that in mind, our goal is one of the most common goals on the internet: build a functional blog to promote our band, or business, or ideas.

      Extra Credit: Consider watching the optional HTML and CSS Workflow prerequisite series that was mentioned in this video.

  2. Section 2 The Basics

    1. Free Episode Run Time 4:32

      Let's begin with the basics. If you load the home page for any new Laravel app in the browser, you'll see a basic "welcome" splash page. In this lesson, we'll figure out how a route "listens" for a URI and then loads a view (or HTML) in response.

    2. Free Episode Run Time 2:54

      Now that we understand how a particular URI ultimately loads a piece of HTML, let's now figure out how to include some generic CSS and JavaScript assets.

    3. Free Episode Run Time 6:25

      The simplest form of our blog will surely consist of a list of blog post excerpts, which then individually link to a different page that contains the full post. Let's begin working toward that goal.

    4. Free Episode Run Time 8:09

      Before we reach for a database, let's discuss how to store each blog post within its own HTML file. Then, in our routes file, we can use a route wildcard to determine which post needs to be fetched and passed to the view.

    5. Free Episode Run Time 3:59

      Sometimes, you'll wish to limit a route wildcard to only a certain sequence or pattern of characters. Luckily, Laravel makes this a cinch. In this episode, we'll add a constraint to our route to ensure that the blog post slug consists exclusively of any combination of letters, numbers, dashes, and underscores.

    6. Reaching for file_get_contents() each time a blog post is viewed isn't ideal. Think about it: if ten thousand people view a blog post at the same time, that means you're calling file_get_contents() ten thousand times. That surely seems wasteful, particularly when blog posts rarely change. What if we instead cached the HTML for each post to improve performance? Learn how in this episode.

    7. Let's now figure out to fetch and read all posts within the resources/posts directory. Once we have a suitable array, we can then loop over them and display each on the main blog overview page.

    8. At the conclusion of the previous episode, we considered adding metadata to the top of each post file. As it turns out, this metadata format has a name: Yaml Front Matter. Let's see if we can find a Composer package to help us parse it. This will give us a nice opportunity to learn how easy and useful Composer is.

    9. Each post now includes the publish date as part of its metadata, however, the feed is not currently sorted according to that date. Luckily, because we're using Laravel collections, tasks like this our a cinch. In this episode, we'll fix the sorting and then discuss "forever" caching.

  3. Section 3 Blade

    1. Free Episode Run Time 7:56

      Blade is Laravel's templating engine for your views. You can think of it as a layer on top of PHP to make the syntax required for constructing these views as clean and terse as possible. Ultimately, these Blade templates will be compiled to vanilla PHP behind the scenes.

    2. Free Episode Run Time 8:05

      The next problem we need to solve relates to the fact that each of our views contains the full HTML structure - including any potential scripts and stylesheets. This means, should we need to add a new stylesheet, we must update every single view. This clearly won't do. Instead, we can reach for layout files to reduce duplication. In this episode, I'll demonstrate two different ways to create layouts.

    3. Free Episode Run Time 3:50

      Before we move on to the next chapter, on databases, let's make a couple tweaks to wrap up these last two sections. First, we'll remove the route constraint that is no longer required. Then, we'll consider the benefits of adding a second Post::findOrFail() method that automatically aborts if no post matching the given slug is found.

  4. Section 4 Working With Databases

    1. Every application will require a certain amount of environment-specific configuration. Examples for this might be the name of the database you're connecting to, or which mail host and port your app uses, or even special keys and secret tokens that third party APIs provide you. You can store configuration like this within your .env file, which is located in your project root. In this episode, we'll discuss the essentials of environment files, and then move on to connecting to a MySQL database (using TablePlus).

    2. Now that we've properly connected to MySQL, let's switch our attention over to those mysterious migration classes. Think of a migration as a blueprint for a database table.

    3. Let's now move on to Eloquent, which is Laravel's Active Record implementation. Eloquent allows us to map a database table record to a corresponding Eloquent object. In this episode, you'll learn the initial API - which should seem quite familiar if you followed along with the previous chapter.

    4. Now that you're a bit more familiar with migration classes and Eloquent models, let's apply this learning to our blog project. We'll remove the old file-based implementation from the previous chapter, and replace it with a brand new Post Eloquent model. We'll also prepare a migration to build up the posts table.

*Series still in development. Check back often for updates.