Ajax form vs regular form?

Published 3 weeks ago by GTHell

I feel like Ajax form is much more better but if so, why not many website adopt it. Is it having disadvantage that I'm not aware of?

Best Answer (As Selected By GTHell)
Snapey

Ajax request is supported in all browsers. Version 2 is supported in almost all browsers.

I don't think you have a worry unless forms are being completed on a nintendo wii

https://caniuse.com/#feat=xhr2

Regarding the second question. Do you want contacting by the users if someone says they used the contact form but nothing appeared? If you save in the database, you can build a UI to display all enquiries.

MaverickChan

yes , browser support.

GTHell

@MaverickChan I'm focusing on mobile and I heard that all browser on iPhone are just a reskin of safari webkit. Does safari has problem with it or only IE?

jlrdw
jlrdw
3 weeks ago (251,320 XP)

Say you have a ledger (checkbook type) application. Many users like in place edit for things like that. That's where ajax is good.

Hard core business forms (entering loads at trucking company) not so much.

MaverickChan

sorry , i'm afraid i can't answer that because i don't have any experience of mobile develop.

jlrdw
jlrdw
3 weeks ago (251,320 XP)

If you are just looking at making an app mobile friendly, that's where media queries come in. But an API is different.

Either way, I use Browserstack to see real time how application looks. And don't forget the Google mobile friendly checker.

GTHell

@jlrdw I'm implemented Ajax form. It's a contact form with different subjects. It has Job Hiring, Leasing and General Enquiry. What I've done so far is validate on front-end then verify with recaptcha then send to backend and verify the recaptcha and send the status back to front end. All I have left is validate datas on backend, log/insert to database and send mail. Is this count as big or just another simple form that can get away with ajax?

jlrdw
jlrdw
3 weeks ago (251,320 XP)

That was example you can do big form with Ajax also that doesn't matter.

anonymouse703

Try to update your browser version... There are some AJAX syntax not supported in old browsers version.

Snapey
Snapey
3 weeks ago (1,036,605 XP)

browser compatibility is good, so I dont think thats an issue.

The main problem is that it is harder to handle well because it relies on frontend skills as well as backend skills.

Its also pointless if after form submission the user is redirected elsewhere anyway.

GTHell

@Snapey I think my frontend is 99% completed with everything from security, validation to UX. It's a bit more work than regular form but it worth the time. Yet I do concern about the user because I know not all of them know the difference between Internet explorer and google chrome. A quick glance into reality, people still use Windows 7 which has a really bad IE by default.

I still have one more problem. I try to decide between logging and database. What do you think is a better choice? The end goal is just to send all the form data to email of each department but I need to reserve data somewhere for a recovery plan or emergency.

Snapey
Snapey
3 weeks ago (1,036,605 XP)

Ajax request is supported in all browsers. Version 2 is supported in almost all browsers.

I don't think you have a worry unless forms are being completed on a nintendo wii

https://caniuse.com/#feat=xhr2

Regarding the second question. Do you want contacting by the users if someone says they used the contact form but nothing appeared? If you save in the database, you can build a UI to display all enquiries.

GTHell

One they submit the form, all the information will send through email to the responsible people. I'm just thinking of having some sort of backup incase something happen. I'm not plan for the UI. Too much work. I use gmail for sending out so I think it's more safe than my own application but still I feel like I need to back all those data up somewhere.

I want database too but that would be 4-5 different tables for storing enquiry. Is there a db design for this though?

Snapey
Snapey
2 weeks ago (1,036,605 XP)

I want database too but that would be 4-5 different tables for storing enquiry. Is there a db design for this though?

You only need a text field that you can copy the email into, plus the created_date

Cronix
Cronix
2 weeks ago (783,370 XP)

I use gmail for sending out so I think it's more safe than my own application but still I feel like I need to back all those data up somewhere.

You can also just bcc that email to a separate "backup" email account.

Snapey
Snapey
2 weeks ago (1,036,605 XP)

@cronix I would not rely on that as a backup since it relies on the same connection to the mail server. If gmail starts dumping emails because someone changed the password (for instance, just saying, sometimes these things happen ;-) ) then the bcc will be tossed also.

Then the client calls and says we don't seem to have had any enquiries for three weeks. "Oh dear, there is a problem with the email" - "is there a copy kept?"

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